Dorothea Baird (1875-1933)

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Dorothea Baird (1875-1933)

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"The Princess Clementina"
By George Pleydell and A. E. W. Mason.
Produced at the Queen's Theatre, on the 14th December, 1910.

Mr. H. B. Irving, Miss Stella Patrick Campbell, Messrs. Eille Norwood, Chas. Allan, Nigel Playfair, Frank Tyars, Roland Pertuis, Henry Vibart, Frederick Lloyd, E. H. Ruston, A. Whitby, J. Patric Curwen, A. Curtis, Howlett, Staite, Lowder, Trevor Roper, Tom Reynolds, H. Robinson, W. H. Graham, Misses Helen Rous, Grace Croft, Mary Foster, and Dorothea Baird.

It is usual, when criticising historical plays, to use the phrase "as every schoolboy knows," when reference is made to the principal characters. Now, very few schoolboys, and fewer critics, know the history of Charles Wogan. He was quite a romantic person in his time, and his time was 1719 and thereabouts. That period of his life whereon "The Princess Clementina" hangs was, perhaps, the most adventurous part of it.

Wogan hears from King James III., son of the exiled James Stuart, that the Princess Clementina is imprisoned at Innspruck. Why or wherefore doesn't matter. She is a lady in distress, and a very pretty one at that, and Charlcs Wogan and his three merry officers can never hear of a lady in such a position without endeavouring to rescue her. The King in his chamber at Bologna at last consents to the four of them trying to bring the Princess Clementina to Bologna, where he, James III., will marry her. They succeed, but after going through adventures and perils on the road, they arrive in Bologna to find that the King is in Spain. The Princess is much hurt at His Majesty's apparent indifference, but finally consents to be married, at once, to the King by proxy. The proxy chosen is Charles Wogan. The pair have become greatly attached to one another during their journey from Innsbruck, but duty overcomes love-much to the joy of the stickler for historical fact, and much to the disappointment of the pit and gaIlery-and the story ends with the marriage of the Princess to the King through his proxy, Charles Wogan.

There were some fine moments at the Queen's Theatre during the performance of the play. I was a little bit sorry that Mr. Irving's Wogan was so dramatic. It wanted more human nature; less dignity and more romance. Still, he touched lightly on the right note. Miss Stella Patrick Campbell made a pretty, dainty Princess. Miss Dorothea Baird had little to do as Jenny, but while she was on the stage she roused enthusiasm. The play was well mounted. Four acts. involving eight scenes, did away with any suggestion of monotony.

Playgoer and Society Illustrated, Vol III No 16, January 1911.

Movie Credits (source www.imdb.com)
1911 - Princess Clementina [Jenny]
1917 - Motherhood [the Helper]


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