Winifred Barnes (1892-1935)

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Winifred Barnes (1892-1935)

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"THE HAPPY DAY"
By G.H. Jessop and Sydney Jones.
Produced at Daly's Theatre, London
Reveiwed in Lloyds Weekly News [London, UK] - 14th May, 1916

A familiar drawl, "Oh, I se-a-y," in the wings, a delighted echo of applause - and G. P. Huntley was on the stage. But not the usual "G.P." Here was the immaculate minus the famous moustache, and plus a limp, verv shiny elbows - and a brogue! "G. P." the lordling, as a tramp, in fact!

The new Huntley, clever as of yore, but in a new, unexpected way, was the delight of "The Happy Day" at Daly's last night. But the whole evening was full of happy moments. Dalyites were applauding well-known favourites before and behind the footlights all the evening. Most of the overture was quite inaudible amid their enthusiasm!

The new piece is better musically and dramatically than the usual Daly's piece. People like Arthur Wontner and Miss Rosina Filippi made the fairy-tale of princes and princesses in incognito grip the house. Then Miss Winifred Barnes was the dearest of musical comedy princesses. Her song "It must be wonderful to be as poor as that," was an immediate success.

Mr. Seymour Hicks's story and Mr. Rubens' music are both delightful. And the reception of "The Happy Day" shows that it may well eclipse all other Daly successes.


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