Iris Hoey (1885-1979)

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Iris Hoey (1885-1979)

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Some known facts:

Played in: Oh! Oh! Delphine, The Pearl Girl

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"The Pearl Girl."
Book and Lyrics by Basil Hood, Music by Hugo Felix and Howard Talbot.
Produced at the The Shaftesbury Theatre, October 1913.
With Iris Hoey as 'The Pearl Girl'.

Dainty, tuneful and amusing, "The Pearl Girl" is a worthy follower of former successes at the Shaftesbury. The briefest outline of the plot will show the trend of the story.

The beautiful "Pearl Queen" of the Argentine, Mme. Alvarez, in London on a visit, hears a rumour that her wonderful jewels are threatened by a gang of foreign thieves. She goes to the Palmyra Pearl premises in Bond Street, and commissions the manager to make her a duplicate set of imitation pearls, which she will wear in place of the real ones. She begs the clever lady secretary of the company, Miranda Peploe, to settle up everything for her, leaving her a large sum of money for the purpose. Miranda has a great idea. Why should she not impersonate the Pearl Queen in English society for a season? She does so, and in the second act we find the little lady in the elite of society, holding her own with the best of them, and securing in the end the hand of the handsome young Duke of Trent.

Miss Iris Hoey is the "Pearl Girl," and is as irresistible as ever. Miss Cicely Courtneidge dances with her usual distinction, and acts with great vivacity as Lady Betty; and Miss Ada Blanche is droll beyond measure in a comic character part. Miss Marjorie Maxwell looks beautiful and acts with skill as Mme. Alvarez. Miss Dorothea Temple makes a stately Duchess, and some exquisite dancing is contributed by Miss Sadrene Storri. With Mr. Alfred Lester as a shop assistant laughter is assured whenever he is on the stage.

Many new ideas are to be gathered from the dresses in "The Pearl Girl." In the hunting scene one is struck by the exquisite blending of the forest-green cloth costumes faced with lemon-coloured cloth worn by the Duke and his friends, as they are in perfect harmony with the woodland scenery, including the mossy rocks. Very effective, too, are the dresses of the pearl girls; they are of dove-grey charmeuse, with lace bodices and aprons, the lace tunics being provided with small pockets. Standing out with special prominence in this scene is Miss Marjorie Maxwell's gown (she assumes the role of Madame Alvarez). It is fashioned of a delicate shade of chartreuse yellow ninon, relieved with skunk and black velvet. An entire jaguar skin is requisitioned in the making of the muff. It is trimmed with heads and tails of this animal.

In the "Hurblage" scene there is a veritable constellation of beautiful toilettes. Miss Iris Hoey's is of white broche with a Medici collar, quite a new departure being a drapery of flame-coloured silk supplemented with flounces in the vicinity of the waist. The scheme is completed by a black mob cap with a white and black osprey above each ear. In Miss Sadrene Storri's gown the crinoline note is cleverly introduced, the entire costume being carried out in pale pink chiffon relieved with sable.

Playgoer and Society Illustrated, Vol IX No 50, October 1913.

Movie Credits (source www.imdb.com)
1922 - East Lynne [Isabel Carlyle]
1931 - Her Reputation [Dultitia Sloan]
1933 - Those Were the Days [Agatha Poskett]
1935 - Royal Cavalcade
1935 - Once In a Million
1936 - The Tenth Man [Lady Etchingham]
1936 - A Star Fell From Heaven [Frau Heinmeyer]
1936 - Once in a Million [Mrs Fenwick]
1936 - Living Dangerously [Lady Annesley]
1936 - The Limping Man [Mrs Paget]
1937 - The Perfect Crime [Mrs Pennypacker]
1937 - Let's Make a Night of It [Laura Boydell]
1938 - Pygmalion [Ysabel (social reporter)]
1938 - The Terror [Mrs Elvery]
1938 - Jane Steps Out [Mrs Wilton]
1939 - Just William [Mrs Brown]
1940 - The Midas Touch [Ellie Morgan]
1949 - Poet's Pub [Lady Keith]
1950 - The Girl Who Couldn't Quite [Janet]


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