Carrie Moore (1883-1956)

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Carrie Moore (1883-1956)

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Some known facts:
Played in: The Blue Moon

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"THE BLUE MOON"
By Harold Ellis, Percy Greenbank, Howard Talbot and Mr. Paul Rubens.
Produced at The Lyric Theatre - 28th August, 1905.
Reveiwed in The Daily Mail (London).

MERRY MUSICAL PLAY AT THE LYRIC THEATRE

It is just as well in writing of a musical comedy to state definitely and at the outset the names of the many alert gentlemen responsible for the various features of the entertainment. The original book of "The Blue Moon," then, seen at the Lyric Theatre last night for the first time in London, was written by the late Harold Ellis, and has since been revised by Mr. A. M. Thompson, The lyrics are by Mr. Percy Greenbank and Mr. Paul Rubens. The music has been composed by Mr. Howard Talbot and Mr. Paul Rubens. Finally, the piece has been produced by Mr. Robert Courtneidge, whose works at Manchester have proved him one of the cleverest and most artistic stage-managers of the day. The result of this formidable combination is the desired result; that is to say, the pleasant, light, more or less connected variety show so dear to the heart of the tired Londoner in search of a jolly digestive. What matter if the story is conventional or the music tinkly? There are plenty of neat lyrics, comic situations, and pretty love-scenes. The dresses are lovely and charming, and the scenery charming and lovely. "The Blue Moon," in fact, should go.

The curtain rises on the Bungalow at Naga, and here we have palms and Indian girls in clinging dresses, and more palms. We have, too, Mr. Courtice Pounds, as the spruce, amorous, musical, humorous commandant of the garrison (with a shocking cold). We have Mr. Walter Passmore as Private Charlie Taylor, Miss Billie Burke as herself, Mr. Willie Edouin as an Indian juggler from the Old Kent-road, and Miss Florence Smithson a sweet little lady with large eyes, a demure manner, and a clear soprano voice as the "Blue Moon." And the plot? Well, the experienced playgoer who could not construct a musical comedy plot out of those materials deserves never to polish a monocle or whistle a chorus again. "Blue Moon," of course, is to wed an Indian prince, but she loves, and is loved by, an English baritone. Charlie Taylor has his difficulties, the Major his entanglements, and Mr. Edouin his juggling tricks. Other people love other people in the old, dear, musical-comedy way, and the curtain falls on countless prospective marriages. Mr. Edouin seemed a little uncertain in the part of the Cockney juggler, but he scored his laughs. Mr. Courtice Pounds, as we have stated, was badly handicapped, yet his charm of personality was as irresistible as ever, and he sang his best number, "The Burmah Girl," as only Courtice Pounds could sing it even with a cold.

The discovery of the evening was Miss Florence Smithson. Never has a daintier, quainter, more plaintive little singer graced the boards of the lyric stage. Mr. Walter Passmore danced very nimbly, and made a hit with an eccentric number, entitled "The Crocodile." Miss Carrie Moore made a sly, useful maid. The large audience, despite the tempest of rain that met them as they left the theatre, went away in great good homour.

The Daily Mail (London) - 29th August, 1905

Movie Credits (source www.imdb.com)
1949 - Sons of Matthew (aka The Rugged O'Riordans) [Midwife]


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